N'oubliez jamais

Modérateur: Modérateurs et Modératrices

N'oubliez jamais

Messagede pierre » 27 Oct 2015, 00:33

19.02.1999 - Intel vient de sortir son Pentium III

Il y a un Guid dedans, un code unique, d'espionnage, faisant partie du matériel, permettant de surveiller les utilisateurs d'un ordinateur.

Les GUID, avec les Web Bug (ou tout ce qui se comporte comme un Web Bug), sont le couple infernal de la surveillance, sans relâche, de chacun d'entre nous.

After Intel Chip's Debut, Critics Step Up Attack

WASHINGTON -- The day after Intel Corp. unveiled its powerful new Pentium III chip, privacy groups boycotting the chip said they had enlisted two new allies in their push for both a federal investigation of the chip's controversial identification system and a potential extension of the boycott to computer makers who refuse to disable the identification feature.
Also on Thursday, the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) said it had mailed a flurry of Freedom of Information Act requests to federal agencies requesting documentation of any role the government may have played in persuading the company to include the unique identifier in its new chip.
Although conceding there was no evidence the government was involved, EPIC's general counsel, David Sobel, said, "There have been many indications over the past few years that investigative agencies like the FBI would like to find a way to diminish the amount of anonymity that currently exists on the Internet." He added, "So when this came along, it rang some bells."
An Intel spokesman, Tom Waldrop, said development of the new technology was driven by corporate customer demands for new ways to help manage extensive computer networks and an interest in enhancing the security of electronic commerce.
Privacy groups, however, say they are concerned that the serial number embedded in each new Pentium III will enable online marketers, even governments, to track computer users' movements on the Internet.
Responding to those concerns, Intel last month announced it would modify the identifying system so that it is automatically disabled, unless the computer user uses a software utility switch to turn it on. Initial plans called for the identifying system to be automatically turned on, unless computer users chose to switch it off.
But the privacy advocates who called the boycott, EPIC, Junkbusters Corp. and Privacy International, said Intel's modification does not go far enough. They want the system permanently disabled in the hardware.
Although Intel has tried to allay public concerns with statements that they have reversed the system, it is ultimately up to computer makers to decide whether and how to disable the function, a solution that Jason Catlett of Junkbusters called "ineffective and out of [Intel's] hands."
Last week, the groups wrote to a coalition of other privacy and consumer advocates, asking them to sign on to their campaign. On Thursday, Catlett said that the Center for Media Education and the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse have agreed to sign letters they are preparing to send to computer manufacturers and to the Federal Trade Commission.
Other groups, like the American Civil Liberties Union, have not yet responded, he said.
In a draft letter to the chief executives of Compaq Computer Corp., Dell Computer Corp., Gateway 2000 Inc., Hewlett-Packard Company and IBM, the groups ask for information on whether the companies plan to ship the new chips, and if so, how and if they will disable the identification function.
"The organizers are considering extending the boycott to major PC manufacturers who ship Pentium III systems in a configuration that would significantly damage consumer privacy," the draft letter states. "We request your assistance in providing us with information on your company's intentions, so that we can determine our organization's boycott policy regarding your company and any individual consumer products" that contain such a processor serial number.

-
In the letter to the FTC, the groups "ask the Commission to consider what action it might take to reduce the harms to consumer privacy and e-commerce identified here, including any means to compel the company to disable the feature and order a recall, whether directly or through PC manufacturers."

Catlett said he would also ask the FTC to investigative Intel, saying the company engaged in deceptive trade practices. He said the company tried to mislead the public by indicating it had modified the system, even though the ultimate decision on whether or how to modify the system rests with computer makers.
Sobel, of EPIC, said his group on Wednesday sent out more than a dozen letters to government agencies, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the National Security Agency, the Central Intelligence Agency and the Department of Commerce, requesting "copies of all agency records concerning, discussing or relating to proposals and/or techniques for imbedding unique identifiers in computer chips in order to identify a particular computer. This request includes, but is not limited to, any records concerning Intel Corporation's decision to include a unique Processor Serial Number [PSN] in every one of its Pentium III chips."
The requests, he said, were prompted by two things: Intel's assertions during a special trip to Washington last month to meet with the privacy groups that the technology was developed at the request of customers, and the government's history in pushing for development of techniques for reducing anonymity in advanced communications systems.
"Intel told us that the origin of this concept was that the PC manufacturers were asking for this capability because they were being asked for it by their customers. We tried to explore that with them," Sobel said. "I asked them, 'Could it be that the government, as a major procurer of PCs, might have been one of the customers you are making references to?' The guys we were talking to disavowed any knowledge of any government involvement in this concept."
But Sobel cited the government's role in pushing for development of ill-fated Clipper Chip encryption technology in telephones to better track calls. He also cited testimony from Louis Freeh, the director of the FBI, before a Senate subcommittee investigating online child predators last year. In that hearing, Freeh said, "It would be beneficial for Internet service providers to capture and retain Caller ID data on persons accessing ISP lines. The capturing of Caller ID data will greatly assist law enforcement in child pornography/child sexual exploitation investigations."
Sobel said the identifying technology in the Pentium III " seemed to be along the lines as some of those types of suggestions that have previously come from the FBI."
An FBI official referred questions about the Pentium III to Intel, which emphasized that development of the chip was in response to corporate demands.
"The kinds of typical uses in corporate information technology are many, and they are not new," said Waldrop, the Intel spokesman.
The feature, he said, will better enable corporations "to track assets like computers on a network, and also to manage remote systems on a network." It will also enable companies to better limit access to certain reports, he said.
It also has broad implications for business-to-business transactions, to easily validate the identity of people on both ends of an electronic transaction.
"Airline reservations is a good example. If you have travel agents that are part of a network, it can be used to easily identify the agent. Or it could determine taxes and tariffs instantly by knowing the number and where it's from."

http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/99/ ... intel.html
Image
__________________
Pierre (aka Terdef)
Appel à donation - Le site a besoin de votre aide

Comment je me fais avoir/infecter ? - Protéger navigateur, navigation et vie privée - Bloquer publicité et surveillance sur le Web
Accélérer Windows - Accélérer Internet - Décontamination - Installer Malwarebytes - Forums d'entraide

Il ne sera répondu à aucune demande de dépannage posée en MP (Messagerie Privée). Les demandes doivent être publiques et les réponses doivent profiter au public.
Image
Avatar de l’utilisateur
pierre
 
Messages: 24840
Inscription: 20 Mai 2002, 23:01
Localisation: Ici et maintenant

Re: N'oubliez jamais

Messagede pierre » 27 Oct 2015, 00:49

Microsoft to Alter Software in Response to Privacy Concerns

Microsoft ne sera pas de reste et, moins de 3 semaines après le coup du Guid dans le processeur, sort un GUID dans ses logiciels (en réalité, ils avaient déjà préparé le coup : Le 9 avril 1998, Microsoft rachète une société d'espionnage des internautes créée en 1995 : Firefly).

La preuve de son usage et de son efficacité ? Le 1er avril 1999, David L. Smith est arrêté grâce à un GUID de son ordinateur, l'adresse MAC, comparé à celui reproduit à l'insu de tous dans les documents créés depuis un ordinateur utilisant des logiciels Microsoft. David L. Smith venait de lancer le virus Melissa 6 jours avant, le 26 mars 1999.

Microsoft to Alter Software in Response to Privacy Concerns

By JOHN MARKOFF

SAN FRANCISCO -- The Microsoft Corporation moved to defuse a potentially explosive privacy issue today, saying it would modify a feature of its Windows 98 operating system that has been quietly used to create a vast data base of personal information about computer users.

Microsoft conceded that the feature, a unique identifying number used by Windows and other Microsoft products, had the potential to be far more invasive than a traceable serial number in the Intel Corporation's new Pentium III that has privacy advocates up in arms. The difference is that the Windows number is tied to an individual's name, to identifying numbers on the hardware in his computer and even to documents that he creates.

The combination of the Windows number with all these data, the company said, could result in the ability to track a single user and the documents he created across vast computer networks. Hackers could compromise the resulting data base, or subpoenas might allow authorities to gain access to information that would otherwise remain private and unavailable. Privacy advocates fear that availability will lead to abuses.

"We're definitely sensitive to any privacy concerns," Robert Bennett, Microsoft's group product manager for Windows, said.

"The software was not supposed to send this information unless the computer user checked a specific option."

Mr. Bennett said the option to collect the information had been added to the software so that Microsoft support employees would be able to help users diagnose problems with their computers more accurately. He said the Redmond, Wash., software giant had never intended to use the data for marketing purposes.

In response to a complaint from a software programmer in Massachusetts, Microsoft will not only alter the way the registration program works in the next maintenance release of Windows 98, Mr. Bennett said. He said Microsoft technicians would look through the company's data bases and expunge information that had been improperly collected as a result of earlier versions.

The company is also exploring the possibility of creating a free utility program that would make it possible for Windows users to delete the serial number information from a small data base in the part of Windows system known as the registry, where it is now collected.

Microsoft has been discussing the issue with a Cambridge, Mass., programmer who contacted the company earlier this week after discovering that the Microsoft Office business software was creating unique numbers identifying a user's personal computer and embedding them in spreadsheet and word processing documents.

The programmer, Robert M. Smith, who is the president of Phar Lap Software Inc., a software tools development company, told the company that he believed the practice created a potential threat to privacy.

Microsoft officials said earlier this week that the numbers generated by the company's software were part of an effort to keep different components from interfering with each other in an increasingly complex world of networked computers.

However, Mr. Smith said that the number, in effect, created a "digital fingerprint" that could be used to match a document created by a word processing or spreadsheet program with a particular computer.

On Thursday, after further studying the "registration wizard" -- the software module that enables customers to register their copies of Windows 98 operating system for support and updates -- Mr. Smith discovered that the number, known as a Globally Unique Identifier, was being transmitted to Microsoft as part of a list of registration information that generally includes the owner's name, address, phone number and other demographic information as well as details about the hardware and software on or attached to the user's computer.

"Microsoft never asked me if it was O.K. to send in this number, and they never said it was being sent," Mr. Smith said. "They are apparently building a data base that relates Ethernet adapter addresses to personal information."

Ethernet adapters are cards inserted in a personal computer that enable it to connect to high-speed networks within organizations and through them to the Internet.

The controversy erupted just weeks after Intel, maker of the most widely used processors for machines that use the Windows operating system, agreed to make it possible for computer manufacturers to set its new Pentium III computer chip so that a serial number on the chip would not be recorded without the computer user's permission.

Privacy activists have been attacking both companies, arguing that identification numbers can be easily misused to create electronic monitoring systems. Such systems could track a computer user's behavior in cyberspace or create dossiers of personal information about individuals.

The issue has sparked a heated debate over the fundamental technology of modern computer networks and software systems, which routinely employ serial numbers to identify individual computers and software modules, known as "objects," that can be shared by a number of programs.

But the Intel number only identified a computer. The Windows number identifies a person. And because the Windows number created a potential linkage between individuals and confidential documents they created, privacy advocates said they were outraged.

"I think this is horrendous," said Jason Catlett, president of Junkbusters, a consumer privacy organization based in Greenbrook, N.J. "They're tattooing a number into each file. Think of the implications. If some whistle blower sends a file, it can be traced back to the person himself. It's an extremely dangerous feature. Why did they do it?"

Privacy groups have long warned about the dangers of centralized information and of monitoring electronic behavior. The groups have been discussing the implications of the serial number on the Pentium III with Intel, and while some privacy advocates acknowledge that the number can play an important role in protecting both privacy and security, others have called for a boycott of Intel, arguing that the likelihood of misuse of the number outweighs its benefits.

Beyond the fear of a centralized Big Brother, they add that the rise of the Internet has made it possible for individual companies to freely use detailed personal information for commercial ends.

"The problem is the absence of legal rules that limit the collection and use of personal information," said Marc Rotenberg, director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington.

"It's clear to me that large Internet companies such as Microsoft, AOL and Netscape will try to squeeze out privacy."

Microsoft executives said on Friday evening that they had developed the feature for technical reasons related to the need to distinguish between millions of different hardware and software objects on the Internet. They said they had never considered the privacy implications.

According to Microsoft software engineers, the roots of the company's numbering system go back to a system developed by computer researchers at the Open Software Foundation in Cambridge in the early 1990's.

In an effort to develop technology that would enable computer systems to communicate across a network, a numbering system known as a Universally Unique Identifier, or UUID, was established as part of a software standard known as the Distributed Computing Environment, or DCE. Microsoft relied on this standard when it developed a remote computing capability for Windows known as Object Linking and Embedding, or OLE.

The company's designers changed UUID to GUID, for Globally Unique Identifier, and that term is now widely used by software applications.

For example, the GUID is used in setting "cookies" -- files that World Wide Web sites send to a visitor's hard drive to identify the user later and to track his or her travels through the Web.

http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/99/ ... 7soft.html
Image
__________________
Pierre (aka Terdef)
Appel à donation - Le site a besoin de votre aide

Comment je me fais avoir/infecter ? - Protéger navigateur, navigation et vie privée - Bloquer publicité et surveillance sur le Web
Accélérer Windows - Accélérer Internet - Décontamination - Installer Malwarebytes - Forums d'entraide

Il ne sera répondu à aucune demande de dépannage posée en MP (Messagerie Privée). Les demandes doivent être publiques et les réponses doivent profiter au public.
Image
Avatar de l’utilisateur
pierre
 
Messages: 24840
Inscription: 20 Mai 2002, 23:01
Localisation: Ici et maintenant

Re: N'oubliez jamais

Messagede pierre » 28 Oct 2015, 12:24

Depuis Windows 95, chaque version de Microsoft Windows est doté d’une porte dérobée, afin de permettre à la NSA un accès total au système d’exploitation
NSA Trapdoor - NSA KEY - _NSAKEY

NSA Built Back Door In All Microsoft Windows Software Since 1999

In researching the stunning pervasiveness of spying by the government (it’s much more wide spread than you’ve heard even now), we ran across the fact that the FBI wants software programmers to install a backdoor in all software.

Digging a little further, we found a 1999 article by leading European computer publication Heise which noted that the NSA had already built a backdoor into all Windows software:

A careless mistake by Microsoft programmers has revealed that special access codes prepared by the US National Security Agency have been secretly built into Windows. The NSA access system is built into every version of the Windows operating system now in use, except early releases of Windows 95 (and its predecessors). The discovery comes close on the heels of the revelations earlier this year that another US software giant, Lotus, had built an NSA “help information” trapdoor into its Notes system, and that security functions on other software systems had been deliberately crippled.

The first discovery of the new NSA access system was made two years ago by British researcher Dr Nicko van Someren [an expert in computer security]. But it was only a few weeks ago when a second researcher rediscovered the access system. With it, he found the evidence linking it to NSA.

***

Two weeks ago, a US security company came up with conclusive evidence that the second key belongs to NSA. Like Dr van Someren, Andrew Fernandez, chief scientist with Cryptonym of Morrisville, North Carolina, had been probing the presence and significance of the two keys. Then he checked the latest Service Pack release for Windows NT4, Service Pack 5. He found that Microsoft’s developers had failed to remove or “strip” the debugging symbols used to test this software before they released it. Inside the code were the labels for the two keys. One was called “KEY”. The other was called “NSAKEY”.

Fernandes reported his re-discovery of the two CAPI keys, and their secret meaning, to “Advances in Cryptology, Crypto’99″ conference held in Santa Barbara. According to those present at the conference, Windows developers attending the conference did not deny that the “NSA” key was built into their software. But they refused to talk about what the key did, or why it had been put there without users’ knowledge.

A third key?!

But according to two witnesses attending the conference, even Microsoft’s top crypto programmers were astonished to learn that the version of ADVAPI.DLL shipping with Windows 2000 contains not two, but three keys. Brian LaMachia, head of CAPI development at Microsoft was “stunned” to learn of these discoveries, by outsiders. The latest discovery by Dr van Someren is based on advanced search methods which test and report on the “entropy” of programming code.

Within the Microsoft organisation, access to Windows source code is said to be highly compartmentalized, making it easy for modifications to be inserted without the knowledge of even the respective product managers.

Researchers are divided about whether the NSA key could be intended to let US government users of Windows run classified cryptosystems on their machines or whether it is intended to open up anyone’s and everyone’s Windows computer to intelligence gathering techniques deployed by NSA’s burgeoning corps of “information warriors”.

According to Fernandez of Cryptonym, the result of having the secret key inside your Windows operating system “is that it is tremendously easier for the NSA to load unauthorized security services on all copies of Microsoft Windows, and once these security services are loaded, they can effectively compromise your entire operating system“. The NSA key is contained inside all versions of Windows from Windows 95 OSR2 onwards.

***

“How is an IT manager to feel when they learn that in every copy of Windows sold, Microsoft has a ‘back door’ for NSA – making it orders of magnitude easier for the US government to access your computer?” he asked.

We have repeatedly pointed out that widespread spying on Americans began prior to 9/11.

http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article40836.html (découvert le 27.10.2015)
Image
__________________
Pierre (aka Terdef)
Appel à donation - Le site a besoin de votre aide

Comment je me fais avoir/infecter ? - Protéger navigateur, navigation et vie privée - Bloquer publicité et surveillance sur le Web
Accélérer Windows - Accélérer Internet - Décontamination - Installer Malwarebytes - Forums d'entraide

Il ne sera répondu à aucune demande de dépannage posée en MP (Messagerie Privée). Les demandes doivent être publiques et les réponses doivent profiter au public.
Image
Avatar de l’utilisateur
pierre
 
Messages: 24840
Inscription: 20 Mai 2002, 23:01
Localisation: Ici et maintenant


Retourner vers Éditoriaux Actualités

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum: Aucun utilisateur enregistré et 1 invité